Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Reintroducing Logic and Reason to the Age of Sentimentalism

prayer

All of the posts under the "prayer" category.

Let’s Learn Latin: The Hail Mary

Have you memorized the Our Father yet? If you have good! If you haven’t, then check out the first lesson in this series.

The Hail Mary is undoubtedly one of the most powerful prayers that we Catholics have at our disposal. Many saints have taught that Satan hates the Hail Mary, which is part of the reason why he hates the Rosary. Additionally, since Latin is the language of the Church, Satan hates prayers when spoken in Latin. So what happens when you combine the awesome power of the Hail Mary with that of Latin? Boom! An instant weapon against Satan and his ilk.

As I did last time, I’ll give you the prayer below, and we’ll memorize this together. If you know the Hail Mary, I ask that you consider sharing and encourage your fellow Catholics to join in on learning this excellent prayer.

Without further ado:

Áve María, grátia pléna,
Dóminus técum.
Benedícta tu in muliéribus,
et benedíctus frúctus véntris túi, Iésus
Sáncta María, Máter Déi,
óra pro nóbis peccatóribus,
nunc et in hóra mórtis nóstrae.

Amen.

As I said in the last post, we Catholics should know our prayers and responses in Latin. If we expect our priests to start learning and offering the Traditional Latin Mass, we should also do our part. Priests mostly have to learn a brand new Mass when going from the Novus Ordo to the Traditional Latin Mass. The least we can do is be knowledgeable with our responses so that we can assist in the way that we laity can.

Thank you for joining me in this second lesson, and look for future lessons where we will continue to expand our knowledge and dive further into the prayers of our faith.

Jeff February 23, 2020 Leave A Comment Permalink

Let’s Learn Latin: The Our Father

One of my goals for this year is to learn more prayers in Latin. At one point in time, I was able to pray the Rosary in Latin, and it was pretty cool. However, over time, I’ve allowed my Latin to get rusty despite frequent attendance at the Latin Mass. That said, I thought it’d be fun to encourage you all to learn some Latin alongside me. We can go on this journey together.

Now, a simple Google search for “Our Father in Latin” would give you plenty of results, and then you could be off on your way. But what is the fun in that?

For those of you who know the prayer, good job, and keep on plugging along! I ask that you think of someone you know who might need some help with this prayer and pass it along to them. Share this on Facebook, Twitter, or whatever social media platform you prefer.

Without further ado, the Our Father in Latin:

Pater noster qui es in coelis,
sanctificetur nomen tuum;
adveniat regnum tuum,
fiat voluntas tua,
sicut in coelo et in terra.
Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie,
et dimitte nobis debita nostra,
sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris.
et ne nos inducas in tentationem
sed libera nos a malo.
Amen.

As laity, we need to learn the language of the Church, which has been and always will be Latin. If we desire our priests to offer the Traditional Latin Mass, then we should do our part and learn our prayers, as well as our responses in Latin. Priests have an enormous task before them to learn the entire Mass in Latin, along with various postures and positions that are different than that of the Novus Ordo.

Thank you for joining me in this first lesson, and look for future lessons where we will continue to expand our knowledge and dive further into the prayers of our faith.

Let’s Learn Latin: The Hail Mary is the next lesson.

Jeff February 11, 2020 2 Comments Permalink

Put Pride In Its Place With the Litany of Humility

It’s difficult not to care what other people think about us. It’s part of our fallen human nature. Too often, we find ourselves making decisions based on what we perceive other people’s reactions might be when the reality is that they probably don’t even care. Caring about other’s perceptions becomes problematic when we put their opinion over that of God’s.

This example is but one of many ways in which pride rears its ugly head. I know that for me, I’ve made a lot of decisions based on what I think friends, colleagues, relatives, etc., would think. I’ve personally found that this has been a problem within my professional career, trying to appear smarter than I am or just trying to make coworkers happy, even if it meant that it would put me in a worse position.

We generally do not make wise decisions when we are too busy trying to make those around us happy. Do not confuse this statement with that of doing good works to make those around us happy. What I mean specifically is that when we are too busy trying to make those around us, or even ourselves content in the short term, it does not necessarily set us up for success in the long term.

One way in which we can begin to stop caring about what other people think (again, in the right context), is by praying the Litany of Humility on a regular, if not daily, basis. The Litany of Humility, if you haven’t ever prayed it before, is a litany that automatically humbles even the proudest. We pray for a desire to rid ourselves of the faults and failings that attach itself to pride. One example of which is asking Jesus to deliver us from a desire of being loved.

Through this Litany, we ask Jesus to humble us completely. And it works. I have found that since adding this prayer to my morning prayers that I do not care about what others think. Granted, I am still a human and have my faults and sometimes slip, but overall, I have found that I do not bother with thoughts about what others might think of me. It is a waste of time and energy that could be spent on more productive activities.

If you are finding that you are struggling with different areas of pride, especially that of what others may think of you, I highly suggest you begin praying the Litany of Humility in your daily prayer. You will find that as time progresses, you will stop caring about what others think about you and begin to focus your energy on pleasing God.

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, Hear me.
From the desire of being esteemed,
Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being loved…
From the desire of being extolled …
From the desire of being honored …
From the desire of being praised …
From the desire of being preferred to others…
From the desire of being consulted …
From the desire of being approved …
From the fear of being humiliated …
From the fear of being despised…
From the fear of suffering rebukes …
From the fear of being calumniated …
From the fear of being forgotten …
From the fear of being ridiculed …
From the fear of being wronged …
From the fear of being suspected …

 

That others may be loved more than I,
Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That others may be esteemed more than I …
That, in the opinion of the world,
others may increase and I may decrease …
That others may be chosen and I set aside …
That others may be praised and I unnoticed …
That others may be preferred to me in everything…
That others may become holier than I, provided that I may become as holy as I should…

On This Fourth Anniversary of Pope Benedict’s Abdication

On this fourth anniversary of Pope Benedict XVI’s abdication of the Papacy, I have some musings that I have been thinking of for some time.

Thoughts on Pope Benedict's Resignation

For Catholics, we are living in a rather difficult period in the Chuch’s almost 2,000-year history. Under the papacy of Pope Francis, faithful Catholics are ridiculed, mocked, and left with a feeling that we have been bad simply for following the teachings of Jesus Christ and His Church.

In contrast with that of Pope Benedict, we feel that we had it so wonderful under his reign. After all, he gave us Summorum Pontificum, encouraged the return to Latin, Ad Orientem, and other reforms to bring reverence back to the Liturgy. I have heard many Catholics pine for the days of Pope Benedict, wishing that we could have him back as our Pope and talk about how great of a Pope he was.

I wish I could say I felt the same way.

Pope Benedict

The truth is, we can thank Pope Benedict for Pope Francis. Pope Benedict, for whatever reason, abdicated the throne. Why he did this has been up for debate for the last four years. Some speculate he was blackmailed, tired, ill, opposed from within (St. Gallen mafia), couldn’t handle the politics, and I’m sure many other reasons that I have yet heard. But for whatever reason, he abandoned us.

If Pope Francis is the abusive father that berates his children behind closed doors and puts on a show of pleasantries for the world to see, Pope Benedict is the father who walked out on his wife and children and left them alone and wounded for the abusive father to waltz right in.

Pope Francis glare

What the Church needs right now is not a return of Pope Benedict, but rather, a Pope who will defend the Church, her teachings, Christ’s teachings, and proclaim the Gospel as given to us by Jesus Christ. We do not need a Pope who will only go half way, but a Pope who will stand by the Church and with full force return her to her former glory.

Enough of the liberal nonsense, enough of the modernist propaganda, enough of the Protestant, all religions are the same garbage and enough of the globalist mentality that has infected and wounded the Church for the last 100 years.

Pray for Pope Emeritus Benedict, pray for Pope Francis, pray for the Church, and pray that God spares us any more of this disastrous papacy.

Jeff February 11, 2017 3 Comments Permalink

Remember the Dead and Pray For Them

Today is the feast of All Souls. It is a day in which we remember those who have died before us and have gone to Purgatory. As the souls in Purgatory need to be cleansed before they can rejoice in the Kingdom of Heaven, it is our job here on Earth, to pray for them to better assist them in their purging.

Purgatory

Remember your deceased relatives and friends. Pray for them frequently. Have Masses said for them. As God has told us that we are not to judge, we must assume that all those who are deceased are in Purgatory. Unless the Church has stated otherwise, we can not assume anybody is in Heaven. We can not assume they are in Hell either. Therefore, we must pray for all the deceased.

Rest assured, if you pray for someone, and they are not in Purgatory for one reason or another, your prayers will be used for other souls in Purgatory. How blessed are we to be able to help and assist our brothers and sisters into getting to Heaven by the incredible power of our prayers.

Jeff November 2, 2015 Leave A Comment Permalink

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