Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Reintroducing Logic and Reason to the Age of Sentimentalism

Pope Francis

All of the posts under the "Pope Francis" category.

The Bar Has Been Set So Low That It Is Lying On The Ground

Low Bar

Did you hear the great news?

Pope Francis spoke out against transgenderism and even said that we need to “think about what Pope Benedict XVI” said!

Yes, this is breaking news in the Catholic world in 2016. The bar has been set low in this papacy that a simple statement pointing back to Pope Benedict is somehow picture proof of how Orthodox Pope Francis is.

Living in a homosexual relationship? That’s okay. Can’t live with the spouse you married and want to live with another? Sure, why not! Love is complicated and such! Transgender? No, that’s the annihilation of man (which is entirely 100% correct). No, the issue is that with a 3 1/2 year papacy, this statement, the statement denouncing transgenderism, is the mark that sets Pope Francis as a stalwart defender of the faith.

Sure, Pope Francis has said that youth unemployment and loneliness of the elderly are two of the greatest evils and has stated that we can’t always talk about abortion, gay marriage, and contraception all the time.

Forget that this man blasphemes God and His Most Blessed Mother every other chance he gets.

No. Pope Francis spoke out against transgenderism.

wpid-wpid-photo-23-sep-2013-0959.jpg

Best. Catholic Ever.

Santo Subito.

Jeff August 8, 2016 Leave A Comment Permalink

Get Your Bingo Cards!

In preparation for World Youth Day, I thought I’d draw your attention to a fun site that is keeping track of all of the various excuses that people give for things Pope Francis says and does.

Over at www.PopeFrancisBingo.com, you can manage your very own Pope Francis Bingo card. The card itself doesn’t save, but you can open up as many browser tabs as you like and each card is randomly generated! You can click on the squares whenever you hear the excuse, and you’ll find a very special marker. You can print out the card if you want to play on the go (there is no mobile version).

Pope Francis Bingo

There is even a handy little form where you can submit any excuses that you haven’t seen within the cards.

Remember, whenever Pope Francis goes on a trip outside of the Vatican, crazy things start happening! Make sure you have your cards ready to go!

Jeff July 21, 2016 1 Comment Permalink

Only The Last 50 Years of Catholicism Matters

For some time now, I have argued that the majority of Catholics view the Church as only being relevant since the Second Vatican Council. So much so, I wrote a parody article explaining how the Church was founded in 1963 when the Holy Spirit descended upon those present at Vatican 2.

We can see evidence of this when we analyze the footnotes of documents that mainstream Catholic authors, as well as the Vatican, has released over the last couple of decades. The number of citations we see to only post-conciliar popes and Vatican 2, in comparison with the number of citations before Vatican 2 demonstrates that many prelates are only looking for examples that go as far back as 1963. Yes, some of these citations do include references to Sacred Scripture, as well as to some saints such as St. Thomas Aquinas.

Lest we forget, St. Thomas Aquinas lived from 1225-1274 and is a Doctor of the Church. His masterpiece The Summa Theologica is considered to be the go-to book on all things theology and Catholic thought. St. Thomas Aquinas’ work has been so influential that his process for thinking out issues was named “Thomistic”, and many Popes declared that his work is the prime example of how Catholics should approach their education.

To better illustrate my point, Donald Cardinal Wuerl released a graphic the other day in which he discusses the number of citations Pope Francis uses in Amoris Laetitia that point back to the pontificates of previous popes.

Pontifical Continuity

Based on Cardinal Wuerl’s graphic, we see that there is a total of 107 citations. Of those 107 citations, only 14 or 13% of them are to St. Thomas Aquinas. 87% of the citations are from the last 50 years of a 2,000-year-old religion. If we are to believe Cardinal Wuerl, then 87% of Pope Francis’ citations are from the last 2.5% of Catholicism’s life-span. Surely there weren’t a few more points that couldn’t have been taken from the vast majority of our faith? You would be hard-pressed to find any document written in the last 50 years that would have even a 50:50 ratio of pre-Vatican 2 to post-Vatican 2 citations (excluding the documents of the Second Vatican Council, of course).

Even more alarming is how the majority of the quotes which are obtained from Pope St. John Paul II’s Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio are taken severely out of context. The same can be said about the quotations taken from St. Thomas Aquinas. Both LMSChairman and the Remnant published articles detailing how Pope Francis misrepresented both of these saints in Amoris Laetitia.

When prelates use only a subset of the Magisterium of the Church while formulating documents, it certainly lends credit to the common misconception that the Church’s teachings were changed (Spoiler: some of them were) during the Second Vatican Council. For the Hermeneutic of Continuity to be true, you would expect that all of the unchanging teachings of the Church be used, not just those that further the agenda of the enemies who have put themselves into prominent positions.

Jeff May 1, 2016 2 Comments Permalink

Amoris Laetitia, Heresy, and All Sorts of Juicy Error

I take a couple of weeks off from blogging, and it seems that all Hell has broken lose.

Now, I took a break because priorities in life had shifted a bit. We welcomed the birth of my daughter just a couple of weeks ago, so I have been busy. She was baptized a couple of days after her birth in the Traditional Rite.

It surprises me how much I have forgotten in just the short year and a half since my son was born. The immense innocence that they possess, not knowing anything really, completely dependent upon their mother and father for all of their needs. My son is already doing a lot on his own and beginning to get himself into trouble, though I admit he is unaware of it.

Having taken this time off from blogging has allowed me to think more of the direction I want to take this blog, and no, I won’t be blogging less, though who knows. Late last summer I was committed to publishing three articles a week, and for a while, I was able to do that. After some time, I got worn out, mostly because I always waited until the last minute and felt that I had to have something.

In my mind, the quality of my posts began to diminish some. They were rushed, they were sloppy, and a lot of times they weren’t properly thought out. That’s not to say all of them were that way, and maybe I’m too hard on myself.

I plan on continuing my writing and analysis on issues that are affecting the Church, including articles on combatting various heresies of our day, differing devotions and how they can help you live a holier life, and other articles meant to proclaim the goodness of Catholicism. I will continue to focus on the antics of Pope Francis, as every single day he does something contrary to Catholic teaching. And since the media stays focused on him, his antics are affecting billions of people. Many will argue to the contrary, but there are already many converts we have lost because they don’t see the need of being Catholic. We observe this with a lot of liberals who claim to “love Pope Francis” but wouldn’t dare become Catholic.

Image courtesy of L'Observa

Image courtesy of L’Osservatore Romano

In the last week alone, we’ve witnessed a disastrous Apostolic Exhortation, Amoris Laetitia, or a letter, which is composed of nearly 60,000 words. I don’t know about you, but if someone wrote me a 230 some odd page letter, I probably wouldn’t read it. This massive document opens up the door for the divorced, remarried, and homosexual to receive the Holy Eucharist. This is blasphemous.

Many Catholic pundits are arguing that Amoris Laetitia doesn’t open up the door in the slightest, which is why bishops such as Archbishop Cupich and the German Cardinals are praising it for being groundbreaking. Either these prelates had a massive conversion, or the document is error-ridden. I’ll place my bets on the latter.

Pope Francis has also sympathized with Judas, claimed that “persecution is the daily bread of the Church“, and scolded those who adhere to tradition, labeling them as Pharisees, because that horse hasn’t been beaten to death enough.

And just today, on his papal presser aboard the “Papal Interviews on a Papal Plane Aren’t Magisterial” plane, Pope Francis admits that the document opens up the door. Then proceeded to say that it isn’t a big deal. Because spending more than two years, two Synods, and writing a 60,000-word letter isn’t a “big deal.”

Pope Francis Papal Presser-AP

Image courtesy of AP

He also accepted 12 Muslim migrants who will be staying at the Vatican. Apparently there were four Christians who were “late with their paperwork”. Right. He accepted the Muslims because they are “children of God,” which any Catholic with a 3rd-grade catechesis knows is heretical because only those who are baptized are Children of God, c.f. Galatians 3:26.

We are living in unprecedented times, times in which we have an openly heretical Pope and not a single priest, bishop, or cardinal who is willing to do a damn thing about it. No, not even Cardinal Burke is going to do anything about it, as he has already given suppressing fire for Amoris Laetitia. I do hope I’m wrong, but he won’t save us.

During this time, we need to stay close to the confessional. We need to be in the state of grace. In the last week, many earthquakes have been reported around the globe, much more than normal. God is not happy with what is going on with His Church.

Continue to pray for the Pope, the Church, your family, and friends. Live a good, holy life, pleasing to the Lord. If you have not done so, I encourage you to consecrate yourself to Jesus through Mary, using St. Louis de Montfort’s method (not Fr. Gaitley’s watered down, wishy-washy method in which he barely discusses what it means to be consecrated).

Most importantly, learn the faith and defend it with your very life. It is getting rough out there, and there’s a good chance your home parish won’t even have your back when push comes to shove.

Jeff April 16, 2016 2 Comments Permalink

Pope Francis Washes Feet During Holy Thursday Liturgy; Breaks Own Rule

Pope Francis broke his rule during the Holy Thursday ceremony of foot washing.

Pope Francis Smiling

If you recall, just a few months ago I reported that Pope Francis changed the rubrics for the washing of feet to allow women to participate. Though the washing of women’s feet has been a common practice in recent years, according to the rubrics, it was never permissible before.

While it comes as no surprise to those who have followed the Pope during his pontificate, Pope Francis washed the feet of several women. He also washed the feet of three Muslims and one Hindu. This behavior isn’t much different compared to his last three years of washing the feet of men and women of various religious creeds. What is different is how this behavior comes just months after he had changed the rules to allow his breaking of them.

It raises the question as to why Pope Francis bothered to change the rules in the first place if he wasn’t even going to follow them. The issue here is that only Catholics can have their feet washed, and the Pope has included non-Catholics in this ritual, though as mentioned earlier, this isn’t the first time he has done so.

Some may argue that Pope Francis, being the Pope, can change the rules or grant himself permission not to follow them, and perhaps they are right. But what kind of an example does that set to those who are supposed to follow them? Do priests follow the rules he has put forth? Do they ignore them? What can or can’t they ignore? It sets a very dangerous precedent. After all, if we are supposed to follow the Holy Father’s example if he breaks the rules, does that mean we are allowed to as well?

A leader who sets rules and doesn’t follow them isn’t considered a good leader. If anything, they are seen as a tyrant who only makes laws to keep his subjects in line. To use a more recent example, any member of the United States Congress, whether it be the House or the Senate, is exempt from the requirement to purchase healthcare insurance from the “Obamacare” act. It isn’t right that a lawmaker is not required to follow his laws. It would be hypocritical of me to have a rule that states commenters are not allowed to swear, but to proceed to swear throughout my comments. Jesus made many new laws during His time here on Earth, but He followed them.

The Holy Thursday liturgy is supposed to reflect Jesus’ institution of both the Priesthood as well as the Eucharist. However, with the changing of the laws in regards to the washing of feet, the focus has shifted from the priesthood and Jesus Himself to a false notion of “togetherness” and “servitude.” While serving others and sticking together are important aspects of Catholicism, they are not the focus of this liturgy.

Also worth pointing out, Muslims are not our “brothers and sisters”, nor are the Hindus, as we do not share anything with these two different creeds. And while Jesus did, in fact, wash the feet of men who were not Catholic by birth, but rather tax-collectors and Jews, they were followers of Jesus, who were baptized, and were chosen by Jesus to be His priests. They were completely Catholic.

What we see today is just further evidence that Pope Francis doesn’t care about the Catholic faith, but uses Catholicism as a cover to promote his agenda to make a one world religion. By his example and his call that we are all “children of God”, he has effectively stated that all religions are equal and that rules do not matter, even his own.

I propose then that we follow the example of Pope Francis and ignore whatever rules he proposes, as if they aren’t important enough for him to follow, then surely they aren’t important enough for us to follow. Instead, let us look to Christ and the teachings of His Holy Catholic Church over the course of 2,000 years to be our guide. And as always, pray for the Pope and the Church.

Jeff March 24, 2016 1 Comment Permalink

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