Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Reintroducing Logic and Reason to the Age of Sentimentalism

Mary

All of the posts under the "Mary" category.

An Unworthy Slave to Jesus Through Mary

sacred-heart-of-jesus-_amp_-immaculate-heart-of-mary_001

I, your unworthy servant, your slave, am deserving of each lash that you received during your scourging ten-fold. Each strike and each blow that the Romans lashed upon you should be mine. You did not deserve any of the punishment upon which you received, yet you willingly took upon this Cross, so that I may not have to receive this beating.

I should be the one who should be tied upon that pillar. I should be the one upon that cross. Your precious blood does not deserve to be spilled, yet you love me so much that You will it. I deserve this punishment for the numerous times that I have failed you and sinned. For the times that I have spat in your face like the Pharisees and Sanhedrin.

Each blow You received I should have received to atone for the sins and injustices I have committed. Yet as your slave, I do not receive any merits for these. Like you Lord, I offer each blow up for the salvation of others. I give each merit to Your Mother to do as she pleases, for she, being free from Original Sin, is in perfect unity with Your will, and knows where each grace should go.

Please forgive me for each sin I have committed, and assist me to grow in holiness, so that I may love you with my whole heart, and to do Your will, so that upon my death, I may be united with you in Heaven.

The Hail Mary is a Scriptural Prayer

Many Protestants and Catholics falsely believe the Hail Mary is a prayer written by men. On the contrary, it is a prayer which has it’s roots in Sacred Scripture. In order to demonstrate this, let’s compare the Hail Mary with it’s biblical counterparts.

Mary Annunciation

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women…”

And the angel being come in, said unto her: Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women. Luke 1:28 Douay Rheims

“…Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.”

And she cried out with a loud voice, and said: Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb. Luke 1:42 Douay Rheims

Holy Mary, Mother of God

And whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? Luke 1:43 Douay Rheims

Pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

The majority of the prayer is taken from the Bible. While the second half is not taken verbatim from the Bible, it represents core theology that must be recognized by anyone who identifies as Christian. Mary was immaculately conceived. Thus, we can call her holy due to her sinless nature. God is three persons in one, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. She is the Mother of God because Jesus is the Son of God, the second person of the Holy Trinity.

Since Mary is in Heaven, she can intercede for us by presenting our prayer requests to Jesus. We read in John 2:3-5, Mary informs Jesus that the wedding hosts have run out of wine. Jesus, at His mother’s request, transforms water into wine, and not just any wine, but wine that was far superior than what they had been drinking.

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Likewise, in John 19:26-27 we read how Jesus gives Mary to the entire world as mother of all. Thus, Mary is our mother. We are baptized into Jesus Christ, and through this baptism into His body, Mary is our mother. And like any good mother who loves her children, she prays unceasingly for her children to abandon their sin, and return to the Lord, her Lord, her Son.

We ask Mary to pray for us now, because we go through temptations, trials and tribulations on a daily basis. When we are dying in our last hour, we are bombarded by Satan and his minions because he knows this time is crucial. If he can get us to fall during this last hour, he will have our soul with him in Hell for all eternity. We beg Mary to ask God to pour forth His graces upon us. that we may not fall into the trap the enemy has set, so that we may instead be granted access to our inheritance in Heaven. For those of us fortunate to know when the hour of our death is near, we would be wise to have a priest near to hear our confession before we die.

The Hail Mary is a prayer which Satan hates as Mary is the remedy to the sin which Eve brought into the world. Mary, by giving her Magnificat, brought forth Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior. c.f. Genesis 3:15.

Develop a habit of praying the Hail Mary whenever temptation occurs. Run to your mother when trouble is near. Pray the Rosary daily as Mary has given 15 promises to those who faithfully recite it. And remember; Be sober and watch: because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, goeth about seeking whom he may devour.

Jeff April 14, 2015 Leave A Comment Permalink

Rorate Caeli Mass and Missa Cantata Evening Mass

This Saturday, December 13, 2014 at 7am, Father John Gallas will be offering a Rorate Caeli (Extraordinary Form) Mass at the parish of St. Thomas the Apostle in Corcoran, MN.

For those who do not know, the Rorate Caeli Mass is a special Mass in honor of our Mother, Mary. It is a candlelit Mass due to it being so early in the morning. For more information on the Rorate Caeli Mass, check out One Peter Five’s article.

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Also, I was informed at 6pm on Saturday, December 13, Father John Paul Erickson will be offering a Missa Cantata (Extraordinay Form) at the St. John Vianney Seminary Chapel in St. Paul, MN.

If you can make one or the other, you will be in for a beautiful Mass.

Jeff December 8, 2014 1 Comment Permalink

The Luminous Mysteries and Why You Should Dump Them

Luminous Mysteries

On October 16, 2002, Pope St. John Paul II issued his Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, that is “The Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary”. In it, he proposed a recommended new set of mysteries to be meditated on when praying the Rosary.

Those mysteries were the Luminous Mysteries. Composed of The Baptism in the Jordan, the Wedding of Canaa, the Proclamation of the Kingdom of Heaven, the Transfiguration, and the Institution of the Eucharist.

The problem with the Luminous mysteries is simply that they aren’t a requirement, but a recommendation. However, if you look at just about any Catholic pamphlet on the Rosary, they automatically include the Luminous mysteries, as if it was a new Dogma.

Upon issuing the document Pope St. John Paul II states:

Of the many mysteries of Christ’s life, only a few are indicated by the Rosary in the form that has become generally established with the seal of the Church’s approval. The selection was determined by the origin of the prayer, which was based on the number 150, the number of the Psalms in the Psalter.

I believe, however, that to bring out fully the Christological depth of the Rosary it would be suitable to make an addition to the traditional pattern which, while left to the freedom of individuals and communities, could broaden it to include the mysteries of Christ’s public ministry between his Baptism and his Passion. In the course of those mysteries we contemplate important aspects of the person of Christ as the definitive revelation of God. Declared the beloved Son of the Father at the Baptism in the Jordan, Christ is the one who announces the coming of the Kingdom, bears witness to it in his works and proclaims its demands. It is during the years of his public ministry thatthe mystery of Christ is most evidently a mystery of light: “While I am in the world, I am the light of the world” (Jn 9:5).

Consequently, for the Rosary to become more fully a “compendium of the Gospel”, it is fitting to add, following reflection on the Incarnation and the hidden life of Christ (the joyful mysteries) and before focusing on the sufferings of his Passion (the sorrowful mysteries) and the triumph of his Resurrection (the glorious mysteries), a meditation on certain particularly significant moments in his public ministry (the mysteries of light). This addition of these new mysteries, without prejudice to any essential aspect of the prayer’s traditional format, is meant to give it fresh life and to enkindle renewed interest in the Rosary’s place within Christian spirituality as a true doorway to the depths of the Heart of Christ, ocean of joy and of light, of suffering and of glory. – Rosarium Virginis Mariae 19

Pope St. John Paul II rightly gives some history on the Rosary, but not quite enough. It is true that it was based off of the 150 Psalms, but when you pray a “full” Rosary, you pray a total of 150 Hail Mary’s. Hence the name “Mary’s Psalter”.

What Pope St. John Paul II doesn’t mention is how the Rosary was given to Blessed Alan and St. Dominic. It was given by Mary herself. Why would he want to change it? Is Our Mother’s judgment not good enough? If these mysteries were to be included, wouldn’t Our Heavenly Mother have given them to Blessed Alan and St. Dominic?

I will admit, I once prayed them every Thursday. But after realizing that in the hierarchy of the spiritual life, we have the Trinitarian God first, the Blessed Mother second and finally all other holy individuals third.

God let his (daughter/mother/wife) give the Rosary to these holy men. Had this gone against His wishes, He would have prevented it, and in her humility would have obeyed.

There  are also 15 graces tied with a daily recitation of 5 decades of the Rosary. These 15 graces were given to us by Mary herself. Seeing as she only gave us the Joyful, Sorrowful, and Glorious mysteries, it would make logical sense that the 15 graces are only tied with those mysteries. One grace for each mystery.

The other issue is that Pope St. John Paul II alludes that the Rosary is stale. He hints at this by his assessment that adding these decades would breathe “fresh life” into the practice.

A better way to breathe “fresh life” is to emphasize how wonderful the Rosary is and how much better your faith will be for it. Get people to pray the Rosary out of love for Jesus, Mary and the Church. Its a very modernist tactic to suggest that what Mary gave us is no longer good.

Benedictine Rosary

If you like the Luminous mysteries, go a head and pray them, but I suggest you pray the other three sets of mysteries prior to doing so.

Pray the Rosary daily. Satan hates it and he loses when you do.

Jeff May 30, 2014 59 Comments Permalink

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