Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Reintroducing Logic and Reason to the Age of Sentimentalism

God’s Will

All of the posts under the "God’s Will" category.

You Have a Moral Duty To Vote Trump and Defeat Hillary Clinton

With the election looming only three short weeks away, we are hearing more and more Catholics and conservatives talking about something that seems rather absurd; voting for a third party candidate.

Photo taken by Gage Skidmore

Photo taken by Gage Skidmore

Why would I call this idea absurd? Simply put, we have Hillary Clinton, the most radical, pro-abortion candidate to ever run for President in this country as the front-runner of this race, according to polls released thus far.

Hillary Clinton has an excellent chance of winning this election, whether through honesty or rigged elections. The only other candidate who has an excellent chance of winning this election is Donald Trump, a man who has proposed giving us pro-life Supreme Court justices, willing to defend the 2nd Amendment, and many other pro-family values. He has also written a sincere letter to Catholics discussing the importance Catholics have had in building this country and how he will fight for our religious freedom.

No matter what your argument may be in Donald Trump not being “the best man for the job” there is a near zero chance of a third party candidate winning this election. Unless you can convince 60 million people to vote for said candidate in the next 20 days, you are throwing your vote away and allowing Hillary to walk away with this election.

In the third Presidential debate, Hillary admitted that she would put justices on the court that will make abortion legal for all nine months, up until the day the baby is ready to be born. If you are pro-life in the slightest, the very thought of this should leave you appalled, and this should send shivers down your spine. Babies who are ready to be born will die under this woman.

abort baby

But what I have discovered is that it almost appears to me that the Catholic “pro-life” Church in America might want Hillary to win. I have seen numerous Bishops (Archbishop Chaput for example), come out against both candidates, treating Donald Trump as bad, if not worse, than the most radically pro-abortion candidate in the history of this country, a woman who admires Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood.

In 2008, we were told that we couldn’t vote for Obama, but we had to vote for McCain.

In 2012, we were told that we couldn’t vote for Obama, but we had to vote for Romney.

Both of these men were known as soft Republicans who had no interest in running a pro-life platform, except for those pesky six months before the election. Romney ran all of his previous election campaigns for various offices under a pro-choice position. “Well, he is from Massachusetts, but he was pro-life.” McCain was another soft Republican who never did much for the pro-life platform. But with both of these candidates, we were told that we had to stop Obama because of his staunch pro-abortion stance.

Apparently, that isn’t the case anymore now that Hillary is the nominee.

In 2016 we are told to vote our conscience even though Trump has done far more than either McCain or Romney ever had with pro-lifers or Catholics. Trump has given us a list of 20 Supreme Court justices who will uphold the Constitution, and overturn Roe V. Wade when given a chance. But apparently, when push comes to shove, it’s easier to claim to be pro-life when it makes one look like a good Catholic than to actually put those principles into practice.

Catholics and every single person on this planet have a moral duty to stop evil. But all I see Catholics doing is getting up on their high horses, puffing out their chests, and pretending that they are so high and mighty by ignoring Trump and allowing Hillary to walk away with this election, all because they voted their “conscience.”

As Pope St. John Paul II says in Christifideles Laici:

Above all, the common outcry, which is justly made on behalf of human rights-for example, the right to health, to home, to work, to family, to culture-is false and illusory if the right to life, the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other personal rights, is not defended with maximum determination.

The USCCB, in their document Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship write:

Sometimes morally flawed laws already exist. In this situation, the process of framing legislation to protect life is subject to prudential judgment and “the art of the possible.” At times this process may restore justice only partially or gradually. For example, St. John Paul II taught that when a government official who fully opposes abortion cannot succeed in completely overturning a pro-abortion law, he or she may work to improve protection for unborn human life, “limiting the harm done by such a law” and lessening its negative impact as much as possible (Evangelium Vitae, no. 73). Such incremental improvements in the law are acceptable as steps toward the full restoration of justice. However, Catholics must never abandon the moral requirement to seek full protection for all human life from the moment of conception until natural death.

Pope Pius XII, in his March 16, 1946, letter to the Pastors and Lenten Preachers of Rome, wrote:

The exercise of the right to vote is an act of grave responsibility, at least when there is the question involved of electing those whose office it will be to give the country its constitutions and its laws, particularly those which effect, for example, the sanctification of feast days, marriage, family life and school, the various phases of social life. It therefore falls to the Church to explain to the faithful their moral duties which derive from their right to vote.

Again, two years later, Pope Pius XII strictly commands:

It is your right and duty to draw the attention of the faithful to the extraordinary importance of the coming elections and to the moral responsibility which follows from it for those who have the right to vote. In the present circumstances it is strictly obligatory for whoever has the right, man or woman, to take part in the elections. He who abstains, particularly through indolence or cowardice, commits thereby a grave sin, a mortal offense.

Photo by Roaming Catholics

Photo by Roaming Catholics

Anybody who decides not to vote, or votes for a third party candidate (their “conscience”) commits a mortal sin. Thus it is important that you form your conscience properly, and use it to stop evil.

Every single vote matters in this election and for Catholics who want to continue down the pro-life, pro-religious liberty, anti-contraceptives in health care, pro-traditional marriage path, I don’t see them rallying around Trump, the man who is going to stop Hillary. Hillary has promised that she will throw Catholics under the bus.

I urge you, to take what could very well be your last stand against evil. Protect innocent life. Cast your vote for Donald Trump.

Or you can stand on your pedestal and vote your conscience. We’ll both be in the gulags if Hillary wins.

Catholic gulag

Jeff October 20, 2016 1 Comment Permalink

Discerning God’s Will In Difficult Decisions

For the Catholic who is attempting to discern God’s Will, it is difficult to determine when we are going after our will and not God’s.

Ultimately, every decision we make should be in accordance to God’s Will. Now, sometimes our will matches that of God’s, but many times it doesn’t.

From what I have discovered along my journey through the Catholic faith, there are times when I know that God wants me to do something and it is obvious. I simply put my options before God during some time of silence, and it becomes ever apparent what God’s Will is. This practice eventually becomes so easy that you don’t even have to ask, you just know. This occurs when you have a regular prayer life with God and are obedient to Him. The signs become apparent.

However, there comes that time, when decisions are no longer obvious. The gut reaction is to think “God has abandoned me, what do I do?” This is just what happens within our fallen nature as humans. Keep your chin up, it isn’t as bad as you think.

Generally when this happens, it is a sign that you have matured in your faith. God has shown you His Will up to this point and based on what He has shown you, it is now up to you to determine what is His Will and what is not.

Let’s look at it in another light. A young child is in constant need of their father to point out good and bad. Yes, you can have this, no you can’t have this. Don’t do this, do this. The child may or may not come to his father for this guidance, but the father is there nonetheless to ensure that he is not getting himself in trouble. When he gets older, his father isn’t always going to stand over him to make sure that he is doing everything that he needs to do. Now, depending on what is going to occur, he may intervene, but he will gradually let go in order to let him decide what is right and wrong based on what he has taught him.

This is exactly how Our Father in Heaven operates. When we are immature in our faith, we need constant guidance in order to ensure we aren’t getting ourselves in trouble. Similarly, when we have matured, He will be watching us (as God always does), but we have to make the tough decisions ourselves.

We will make poor decisions in our life, but ultimately God will still love us and be there for us in those times. It is critical to note that God never wants us to choose any action that is evil or sinful. Sinful amusements are never in tune with God’s Will simply because God never wants us to sin, as sin cuts us off from Him. If the choice you do make is a sinful choice, go to confession.

There will be times too that God will allow an opportunity in which it appears to have a lot of pros and very few cons, but He wants us to stay either where we at, or take the option that isn’t obvious. Time in prayer will help alleviate this. If you are having difficulty, talk to a trusted spiritual director.

Prayer: How to do it!

Spend much time in prayer, and get a trusted spiritual adviser. Having someone who is more experienced in the faith and closer to God will help you in figuring out those situations where there is no easy answer. Pray, fast and always stand vigilant.

Jeff June 17, 2014 1 Comment Permalink

The Holy Spirit is Not Separable From the Trinity

God is Three Persons in One God. That is, He is Father, Son and Holy Spirit. They do not contradict one another, as they can not. Just as Jesus Christ can not deny the Father or with hold the Holy Spirit, neither can the Father deny the Son or the Holy Spirit. This is basic Church teaching.

Shield-Trinity-Scutum-Fidei-English.svg

This applies also to the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit can not go against the Father nor the Son. If the “Holy Spirit” goes against either the Father or the Son of that which they have already revealed, then you are not dealing with the Holy Spirit, but by a false spirit.

This false spirit can only be that of the Devil or one of his many minions.

Calling upon the Holy Spirit in certain situations in which you feel that you need help, and then going about doing whatever it is you do (some of which may be sinful) is not the Will of God. Calling upon the Holy Spirit must be done in prudence. It is reckless and irresponsible and sinful to cite that the Holy Spirit allowed you to commit a sin.

Be wary also of those who try to state that the Holy Spirit can do things that the Father or the Son can not. This is a denial of God in the Father and in the Son. As far as we know, only God the Father knows all as Jesus hints at in Scripture when it comes to the end times.

Just as the Holy Spirit is inseparable from the Father and the Son, the Father is inseparable from the Son and the Holy Spirit, and the Son is inseparable to the Father and the Holy Spirit.

I would suggest we refer the Holy Spirit as the Holy Ghost, as it brings the person-hood of the Paraclete into a clearer understanding.

Seeing as we are in the Octave of Pentecost, it is an appropriate time to highlight a few things in regards to the Holy Spirit.

The Holy Spirit is not a magical gassy figure, that comes down upon us and makes us do interesting things. The Holy Spirit is still God, and helps us and leads us to God the Father and God the Son. It appears that many want us to believe that the Holy Spirit is something that descends upon us and makes us feel all warm and fuzzy inside. If you do not feel the warm and fuzzies, then you are not doing something right and you are without the Holy Spirit.

There are many gifts of the Holy Spirit, in fact there are 7 of them. Those 7 gifts are: Wisdom, Understanding, Counsel, Fortitude, Knowledge, Piety and Fear of the Lord. These are the actual gifts of the Holy Spirit. These are not to be confused with the spiritual gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The Holy Spirit is still God and is not to be interpreted as separate or separable from the Trinity. Separating any person of the Trinity away would constitute as blasphemy.

Jeff June 10, 2014 2 Comments Permalink

You Belong In This Time Period

My sister-in-law and I both like to talk about how we were “born in the wrong time period”. She argues that she should have been born in the 1700s due to her interest in old time novels such as “Pride and Prejudice” and other Jane Austen novels. She longs for a time when people were cordial and more people were sophisticated.

18th century fun

Like-wise, I feel I should have been born in the mid-to-late 1800s. Back when Catholics knew their faith and weren’t afraid to believe in it. When priests, bishops and cardinals had the guts to stand up and look evil in the face and preach the error of their ways.

TLM Bowing

But there is a deep silliness in wanting to go backwards or forwards in time to a time period in which you think that you would fit in better. God in His infinite wisdom created you to live right now. Had He wanted you to live in your desired time period, He would have done so. We always long for that which we don’t have and for times in which we unfairly assume they would be easier on us.

We all have our cross to bear, and not living in our desired time period would be one of them. On top of that, since God has given me that sense of longing for Catholicism as she was taught for a good 1900+ years (give or take), I have a unique situation in which I can share that with those today (who believe in God only knows what).

Similarly, my sister-in-law has a responsibility to share with our unsophisticated and highly uncordial culture, the finer things in life and how true men and true women are to behave in a properly functioning society.

Many of us know how bad our society and culture is today. Sin abounds. Granted, we have many benefits that the past does not hold (nor possibly the future) that make our lives much easier.

Technology allows for much more information to come through to us, both good and bad. The internet allows me to find Church Documents easily on one website from all of the Popes and Councils that I can easily reference. The built-in find tool allows me go directly to what I am looking for. Unfortunately, the internet also allows for many distractions and heresy to enter into my life that normally wouldn’t be there otherwise. But ultimately, the Truths and proper etiquette of the past, still hold true today, even if they are not practice nor enforced.

I think it is a safe assumption that if you are reading this, you too, long for a traditional sense of worship in the liturgy. You also long for priests, bishops and cardinals to stand up and defend the faith, rather than just let it go. But God instilled in you the desire for His Truth and the courage to seek it out and defend it. Thus, it is a safe assumption to make that you play a valuable role in bringing about the return to chivalry, tradition, and proper interaction.

Do not wish to be taken away from this time period, as God has purposefully put you here. Discern His will, and implement it, bringing the greatness of the past into today’s world.

You Can’t Always Be Joyful

This is a follow-up to the Fallacy of Always Being Joyful. If you haven’t read it yet, I invite you to do so.

After spending much time in prayer and contemplation, I realized that there is, unfortunately, far more things to point out in regards to this fallacy of a Catholic always needing “joy” in order to be Catholic. Hopefully, this will be the last post, but, if the hierarchy continues to expound upon this fallacy, I will have to write more.

The idea that sorrow is somehow unholy, non-Catholic, and even bad is unheard of when you look at all of Christendom. There is no guarantee that once you become Catholic and are practicing the faith (though, if you aren’t practicing the faith then you aren’t Catholic) that you will become so full of joy as the world understands it.

Really, we are all dying, we are all sinners and are all deserving of eternal damnation. That isn’t a very joyous outlook on life is it? But, alas, it is true. It isn’t grim, it isn’t negative, but it is truth. Jesus warns us numerous times throughout the Gospel that the path to Heaven is narrow and few will enter, yet, the attitude of the day is that, if you are a Catholic, you will get an automatic pass, and this is from Church officials (though, if you aren’t Catholic that’s fine too!)

The sense of joy that we Catholics do receive, is that we recognize that we are at least on the right path and are following God as best as we are discerning. This isn’t a guarantee of salvation, but we at least recognize that in following God and His Church, we are at least on the right path, even if we are failing along the way. Ultimately though, when we have properly discerned what God is asking of us, we will experience the true sense of joy, that we as creations of God, are following what the Creator has Willed for us.

What interests me, is that the church (small c) has bought into the lie that the culture has been peddling that we have to be happy, in fact, we can’t be sad at all. If we are sad, then there is something wrong. We must be depressed, and there is a pill to cure that. No longer are we required to do penance, because its painful, inconvenient, and annoying. After all, if it doesn’t feel good, don’t do it, right?

There used to be for the first 1900 years of Catholicism, a sense that sorrow was good, especially when that sorrow was for atonement for our past sins. We should be sorrowful for the times that we have spat in the face of God, turned our back on Him, and gone about seeking our own pleasures. We do it quite often, more than we even consciously realize.

After all, the Church used to be so praiseworthy of sorrow, that even Our Mother Mary has a title of Our Lady of Sorrows!

Don't Cry Mary, You Should Be Joyful!

Don’t Cry Mary, You Should Be Joyful!

Every single Saint was sorrowful at some point in his or her life. To assume otherwise is naive. Look at St. Augustine in his Confessions. Many times he mentions that the thought of some of the sins of his life bring tears to his eyes. It would be wrong to assume that these are tears of joy, as to be joyful for ones sins would warrant unholiness as the sinner would be proud of his sin. This doesn’t work as we must be repentant of our sin from the time we have committed it, until the time that we are no longer on this Earth. This is why the argument “even though I’m sad that I did x, I’m glad I did it because otherwise I wouldn’t be where I’m at today” is a argument rooted in error. Be sorrowful for the action, and be sorrowful that you didn’t follow the Will of God to get to the point you are at today. God never Wills sin, but allows it in his permissive will.

Even Jesus Christ Himself was sorrowful. Let us not forget the 2nd set of mysteries of the Holy Rosary, the Sorrowful mysteries. This includes the mysteries of Jesus Christ’s agony in the Garden of Gethsemane, His flogging at the Pillar, the crowning of thorns, the carrying of the cross and alas, the moment of His Crucifixion and Death. If you forgot what this looked like, let alone what it might have felt like, here is a helpful reminder.

Jesus Crucified

This is not a joyful moment. This is a sorrowful moment. There is a time for joy, and a time for sorrow. Accept that joy and sorrow go hand in hand. After all, how can you appreciate the joyful moments if you have no sorrowful ones? How can you appreciate happiness, if you’ve never once gone through sadness?

 

Jeff March 26, 2014 2 Comments Permalink

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