Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Traditional Roman Catholic Thoughts

Reintroducing Logic and Reason to the Age of Sentimentalism

Let’s Learn Latin: The Our Father

February 11, 2020 | 2 Comments

One of my goals for this year is to learn more prayers in Latin. At one point in time, I was able to pray the Rosary in Latin, and it was pretty cool. However, over time, I’ve allowed my Latin to get rusty despite frequent attendance at the Latin Mass. That said, I thought it’d be fun to encourage you all to learn some Latin alongside me. We can go on this journey together.

Now, a simple Google search for “Our Father in Latin” would give you plenty of results, and then you could be off on your way. But what is the fun in that?

For those of you who know the prayer, good job, and keep on plugging along! I ask that you think of someone you know who might need some help with this prayer and pass it along to them. Share this on Facebook, Twitter, or whatever social media platform you prefer.

Without further ado, the Our Father in Latin:

Pater noster qui es in coelis,
sanctificetur nomen tuum;
adveniat regnum tuum,
fiat voluntas tua,
sicut in coelo et in terra.
Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie,
et dimitte nobis debita nostra,
sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris.
et ne nos inducas in tentationem
sed libera nos a malo.
Amen.

As laity, we need to learn the language of the Church, which has been and always will be Latin. If we desire our priests to offer the Traditional Latin Mass, then we should do our part and learn our prayers, as well as our responses in Latin. Priests have an enormous task before them to learn the entire Mass in Latin, along with various postures and positions that are different than that of the Novus Ordo.

Thank you for joining me in this first lesson, and look for future lessons where we will continue to expand our knowledge and dive further into the prayers of our faith.

2 people are talking about “Let’s Learn Latin: The Our Father

  1. This prayer is exceptionally beautiful in Latin. Learning traditional Catholic prayers in Latin has many merits and can add greater nuance to our understanding of sacred scripture and the works of art that adorn the walls in our churches and cathedrals around the world.

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